Saturday, 16 December 2017

President Trump’s lawyers argue his rights were violated by protesters roughed up by his supporters

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 Donald Trump's right to free speech trumps other people's right to free speech, according to his lawyers.

The President's legal team argued this week that he couldn't have violated the rights of protesters when he called on his supporters to remove them from a campaign rally last year — because they violated his rights first.

"In this case, Plaintiffs interfered with the Trump Campaign's freedom to 'choose the content of (its) own message,'" Trump's lawyers wrote in a motion. "Thus, by interjecting this anti-Trump speech in the middle of a pro-Trump rally, they were obviously transforming the message that Mr. Trump and the Campaign wished the event to convey."
President Trump’s lawyers argue his rights were violated by protesters roughed up by his supporters


The motion was filed in an attempt to dismiss a lawsuit filed by a number of protesters who were violently escorted from a Trump campaign rally in Louisville, Ky., in March 2016 after Trump belted, "Get 'em out of here" from the stage.

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This April, a federal judge allowed the suit to proceed after Trump's lawyers unsuccessfully argued that their client was protected by the First Amendment.

"It is plausible that Trump's direction to 'get 'em out of here' advocated the use of force," the judge, David Hale, wrote at the time. "'Get 'em out of here' is stated in the imperative; it was an order, an instruction, a command."

Even so, Trump's lawyers claimed he had the right on his side.

"Mr. Trump had every right to call for the removal of the disruptors," their motion continued. "Any contrary rule would destroy the right of political campaigns to express their messages at rallies without being sabotaged by intruders." 

Violence often erupted during Trump's campaign rallies, as they typically attracted both protesters and supporters.

Critics frequently accused Trump of spurring the rally violence.

At a campaign gathering in Las Vegas in February 2016, Trump bluntly stated that he wanted to hit a protester in the face.

"I'd like to punch him in the face, I tell ya," Trump said to roaring cheers from his supporters.

Lamenting "political correctness," Trump infamously added that he missed the "old days."

"You know what they used to do to guys like that when they were in a place like this?" Trump asked the crowd. "They'd be carried out on a stretcher, folks."
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Nicki Minaj makes jaws drop (including her own) after sharing topless photo

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 Nicki Minaj makes jaws drop (including her own) after sharing topless photo

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Annette Bening on plastic surgery: 'That's not my thing'

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 Annette Bening turns 60 in May, but don’t expect her to cling to youth through plastic surgery.

“That's not my thing,” the mom of four confessed at a Museum of Moving Image Gala that honored her body of work. “If someone wants to do that, they have every right to do that. It's just not my thing.”

The “Bugsy” star also told us that the world of reality TV, where plastic surgery is commonplace, doesn’t impact her life either.
Annette Bening on plastic surgery: 'That's not my thing'


“It hasn't really affected what I've been doing,” she said. “I don't think it's going to change the acting profession profoundly for those of us who are in it to try and find the best stories to tell, to entertain people, lift them up, make them laugh, move them. I think there will always be a place for that kind of work.”

Later that night, Bening conceded to the audience that many women get “swept away” when they look at her husband, Warren Beatty, “With me, it was different,” she said. “When he looked at me, I got pregnant!”
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Man dies after being shot multiple times outside Brooklyn housing development

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A man was shot to death outside a Brooklyn public housing development while his friends watched in horror, cops said Friday.

The 24-year-old victim was hanging out with his buddies in the Brevoort Houses parking lot on Patchen Ave. near Marion St. in Bedford-Stuyvesant when the shooter approached him at 10 p.m., police said.

Man dies after being shot multiple times outside Brooklyn housing development
The gunman fired several shots, hitting the victim in his right leg, left hip and groin, cops said.
Medics rushed the victim to Kings County Hospital, where he died.

None of the man’s friends were injured by the gunfire, according to police.

The victim’s name was not immediately released.
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Iowa Supreme Court justice orders Des Moines Register newspaper not to publish contents of court records

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 IOWA CITY, Iowa - An Iowa Supreme Court justice has taken the unusual step of temporarily ordering the state's largest newspaper not to publish the contents of court records legally obtained by one of its reporters.

Press freedom advocates protested the order against the Des Moines Register and investigative reporter Clark Kauffman, and called on the full court Friday to immediately lift the stay.

The Iowa Freedom of Information Council, which represents media organizations and advocates for government transparency, called the action by Justice David Wiggins "extraordinary and very troubling."

"We are hopeful the entire Supreme Court will quickly conclude that Justice Wiggins' order goes too far and is an impermissible prior restraint on a free press," said executive director Randy Evans.

Wiggins granted a temporary stay Monday that blocked the newspaper from publishing information obtained from records relating to Des Moines attorney Jaysen McCleary. McCleary argued the records contained private information about his disabilities and finances and were never intended to be public.
Iowa Supreme Court justice orders Des Moines Register newspaper not to publish contents of court records


The records were inadvertently filed publicly by one of McCleary's lawyers in a lawsuit he filed against the city of Des Moines that alleged he suffered injuries when he was hit in the head by a garbage container launched from a city truck. They consisted of reports from experts who had evaluated McCleary, and were available for months in the state's electronic court records. The parties told the court they reached a settlement in November.

Days later, McCleary asked the district court to seal the reports after learning the newspaper had copies, arguing they were meant to be filed confidentially and were subject to an earlier protective order. District Court Judge Jeffrey Farrell sealed the records going forward. But last week he rejected McCleary's motion to hold the newspaper in contempt of court, saying the filings had long been available to the public and the Register wasn't subject to the confidentiality order.

McCleary had also filed a separate lawsuit against Kauffman and the newspaper, seeking a temporary injunction to prevent the publication of the records. In his public filing, McCleary said any story with information that included details about things like his old bankruptcy case and learning disability would cause "irreparable harm" to his right to privacy. He called the information "purely private facts which are not a matter of public concern."

District Court Judge Eliza Ovrom denied McCleary's motion for an injunction on Dec. 7, saying such an order would violate the First Amendment. She also rejected McCleary's request to seal the case from the public.

Wiggins, the Supreme Court justice, issued a temporary stay after McCleary filed an emergency appeal to the high court. Wiggins said the stay would remain in effect until the court could rule on whether to take up McCleary's case.

"Pending further order from this court, the defendants shall not disclose or share (other than with legal counsel) any information in the defendants' possession that was obtained exclusively from the reports," Wiggins wrote.

Separately, McCleary asserted that the newspaper planned to report that he was the "Attorney Doe" in a specific case in which the Iowa Supreme Court has "redacted all filings" and removed video of the oral argument.

Michael Giudicessi, an attorney representing the Register and Kauffman, argued in a filing Thursday that such a stay was a prior restraint on press freedom barred by the Iowa and U.S. constitutions. He asked the full court to vacate the order, which he called "an undesirable and unsustainable outlier in the law and policy of this state and this nation."

He added: "McCleary's conduct as a lawyer and the medical reasons he has relied upon to defend it are matters of public record."

McCleary didn't immediately return an email seeking comment Friday evening from The Associated Press. A phone number listed in court documents for McCleary was disconnected.
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Nelly plans to sue the woman who accused him of rape

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 Nelly intends to sue the woman who accused him of rape, claiming she damaged his reputation.

The rapper's lawyer issued a statement on Friday declaring that the artist would file suit against the woman who accused him of rape and then decided she did not want to cooperate with authorities in an investigation.

"Nelly has suffered very real damage to his reputation. He has incurred economic loss and painfully has watched his family suffer. As a result Nelly is planning to proceed with litigation as the first step in restoring his reputation," his attorney said in a statement to the Daily News.

An unidentified woman claimed Nelly, whose real name is Cornell Haynes Jr., raped her on his tour bus in Washington in October after one of the artist's concerts.

However, she decided not to press charges or move forward with the case, according to the King County Prosecuting Attorney's Office.

"Within days of her initial report to police, the complainant, through her attorney, informed investigators from the Auburn police department that she did not wish to assist in prosecution or the investigation of Mr. Haynes," the prosecutor's office said in a statement to the Daily News.
Nelly plans to sue the woman who accused him of rape
The office's statement continued, "without the assistance of the complainant, this office is unable to proceed or fully assess the merits of the case."

In October, a lawyer for the woman issued a statement as to why she would no longer press the charges, saying she "wishes she had not called 911 because she believes the system is going to fail her."

After Nelly was released from jail on the "investigation of rape" charge, he took to Twitter to defend himself.

"I am confident that once the facts are looked at, it will be very clear that I am the victim of a false allegation," he wrote.

His lawyer, Scott Rosenblum, repeated that sentiment on Friday after it was revealed the case against Nelly was dropped.

"We were confident, that what our investigation revealed from the outset of this allegation would ultimately be clear and Nelly would be vindicated," a statement read.

"Nelly recognizes the need for women who are victims of sexual assault of any kind to be heard and our existing systems changed. Nelly supports various women's advocacy groups that deal with Sexual Assault, and violence against women and is dedicated to raising awareness and furthering the conversation to about bring about necessary changes," the statement continued. "However, this type of reckless false allegation cannot be tolerated as it is an affront to the real survivors of sexual assault."
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Louisiana man found guilty in murder of girlfriend’s molester says he’s ‘not sorry’

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 A Louisiana man facing life behind bars said he’s “not sorry” for murdering the man who molested his girlfriend.

Jace Crehan, 23, admitted to killing Robert Noce Jr. in July 2015 — less than two weeks after the 47-year-old pleaded no contest to a charge of sexually molesting Brittany Monk while he was dating her mother, The Advocate reported. A jury on Thursday found Crehan guilty on charges of second-degree murder.

Monk testified she and her boyfriend only meant to scare Noce when they broke into his trailer in the early hours of the morning, but the situation quickly escalated.

Monk, who was seven months pregnant at the time, admitted to spraying cologne in Noce’s face while screaming “You ruined my life.” She also testified Crehan ordered her to get a knife — she got the “biggest” one she could find — which he used to repeatedly stab Noce, according to WAFB.
Louisiana man found guilty in murder of girlfriend’s molester says he’s ‘not sorry’
Crehan also reportedly wrapped a belt around the convicted molester's neck and used his foot to tighten in it.

The pair discarded the body in a 55-gallon container Noce used to make wine and tossed the knife in a lake.

A few days after the murder, Crehan admitted to detectives that he killed Noce because he believed the justice system “failed” his girlfriend.

“I feel a lot better,” he told them. “It’s not a regret.”

Crehan’s attorney unsuccessfully argued the murder was an “act of passion,” while prosecutors meanwhile described the man’s actions as “vigilante” justice.

“We do not live in a country where we as a society are allowed to take the law into our own hands and do justice,” Darwin Miller said during closing arguments Thursday.

Monk, who pleaded guilty to manslaughter earlier this year, is slated to be sentenced in January. She faces up to 40 years behind bars.
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